Archive for November, 2009

Career Transition for Senior Executives: Different and Not

November 2, 2009

Regardless of a person’s level in an organization, their skill set or their years of experience, there are certain core best practices associated with finding ‘their next opportunity’ that are universal. The basic formula for career transition is virtually the same for a CEO or a middle manager. Everyone at any level needs a list of differentiating SOAR stories (aka PAR/STAR statements). Every job seeker needs a written personal marketing plan, a core resume with industry-specific versions, and a LinkedIN profile.

Everyone will be competing against job seekers that are well polished in terms of their ‘electronic image’ and their interviewing skills and they need to keep pace. The C-Suite executive and the middle manager both need accountability partners and ‘elevator speeches’. Detail items such as appearance, contact cards, thank you cards, and company research are as important for those seeking COO positions as those seeking their first job out of college. An executive job seeker can’t escape these ‘core truths’ and they have to execute them at their highest level or risk “missing the mark” as they shoot for their next career opportunity.

There are differences though.

C-Level and senior executives in career transition do have different needs that have to be addressed. Some of the differences include:

Succession Planning: C-level executives often have a much more visible and planful exit strategy that includes succession planning and successor development;

Executive Coaching: Coaching is no longer just the pervue of senior executives but they do have a higher standard and they need a career coach that keeps up with them;

Executive Assessments: As a senior executive approaches the next phase of their career, it is often helpful to re-examine their personal skills and interest inventories and review them with an expert;

Global Resource Capabilities: Opportunities for c-level and senior executives are a global proposition and they need access and introduction to resources throughout the United States and around the world;

Peer Group Accountability: It is valuable to meet weekly with other senior executives in job search to share successes, failures and contacts that relate directly to their own efforts;

Specialized Resume and Profile Reviews: Senior Level candidates must handle their resumes and LinkedIN profiles differently. There is frankly, a higher standard for senior level executives that must be met in order to be competitive;

Executive Resource Networking: Senior executives need connections at a high level such as executive management, board-level, private equity, and venture capital contacts;

Next Step Options Planning: C-Level executives have different priorities and motives for their career search. To find fulfillment in their next role they often have to explore many options such as continuing on the Executive Track? Exploring Entrepreneurial Ventures? Developing a Multi-Faceted Portfolio Career that includes several profit and non-profit roles? or Pursing an ‘Active’ Retirement?

Research and Resource Support: The reality is that sometimes C-Level executives are used to a support team and research at a much higher level so they need access to the same caliber of resource during their career search.

Assimilation Coaching: Senior executives can also benefit the most from assimilation coaching as they take on their new role

Annual Career Consultations: C-level and senior executives can have a high degree of change as their career evolves so access to some kind of lifetime career consultation can be a valuable benefit

While the process may be essentially the same, the depth of each of step of the process can be significantly different for c-suite and senior executive job seekers and the most competitive organizations are recognizing this as they search for outplacement solutions for their senior executive benefits package.

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